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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
to you want to close? [laughter] >> let me go back to susan rice did in terms of our foreign policy, everybody agrees that hillary clinton has done a fine job -- almost everybody, i guess. >> what exactly has she done right? >> in terms of making policy -- >> you don't think she was that good? >> i think she was a nice presents but i don't see her fingerprints -- >> if you ask me what and we kissinger did, i can tell you. what did she do? >> do we have a dissenting point of view? >> she did a huge number of things, she quieted down more near catastrophes that you can imagine -- >> name on. >> may ii finish? she has done an enormous amount for women. most people did not have the rights that i do on this program to hit you upside the head when i think we're wrong, charles. that would get me killed most places. >> if that is your case, i rest my. >> i think the foreign policy of president obama and secretary clinton has been successful. i take it is hard to argue with that. i think that hillary clinton as the engineer, if not architect of a good part of that, and the turn to it a shot
.s. foreign policy in the middle east in question at this hour. violence spiring out of control in syria after 20 months of civil unrest and the deaths of at least 40,000 murdered civilians at the hands of their own government. united states and nato agreeing to deploy patriot weapons and to thwart an aso-called by assad. the missile systems to be positioned near the syria. his staff denies that and estimates if they were deploy troops, it requires 75,000 of the troops in a full ground invasion in order to seize the chemical weapon stockpile. fox news confirming they were not ordered to draft the consideration of such a mission. secretary of state clinton is nonetheless talking very tough calling for assad to step down as the obama administration has done for the past 15 months, but refusing, still, to detail which consequences those would be. >> we will explore with like-minded countries what more we can do to bring the conflict to an end, but that will require the assad regime making the decision to participate in a political transition, ending the violence against its own people, and we hop
spoke thursday about the future of u.s. foreign policy. the syrian civil war, and other challenges facing the middle east. this came at a forum hosted by "foreign-policy" magazine. she also answer questions. this is an hour. [applause] >> madam secretary, today we solve all your problems. nothing left to worry about, really. actually, the office of policy planning and the foreign policy group made a bet we could bring together leaders from inside government from leaders outside government to have a real discussion about the future of american foreign policy. is there to say based on the conversation we had today that that has paid off. that is especially thanks to say paanalysts and participants to mid really impressive than insightful interventions over the course of the day. i also want to give a special thank you to people at the foreign-policy group and policy planning office, who were the heart and soul of putting today together. if you've given a quick round of applause. -- you could give them a quick round of applause. [applause] we made a second bet that david could shine a
the nature of the obama administration foreign policy is, paul. and susan rice in some ways encapsulates a strain in democratic policy thinking that goes way back, a story that's actually told by samantha power, a close aide to president obama and wrote about genocide in with a randa. and susan rice is state department that makes a cameo appearance in the book, quoted asking, if we call what happened in rwanda genocide, how does it play for us in what were then the mid term elections of 1994. well, there's a pattern here as we see. one is a reluctance to have america be engaged in certain issues, and the second one is politicizing foreign policy issues because they might hurt the president's political stance. >> paul: and you want a secretary of state, if you're-- well, the american people want a secretary of state who is some more independent judgment and not thinking so much about the politics, is that the point? >> that would be one thing that you would look for in the secretary of state. >> paul: sorry for stating the obvious. >> the national interests and not the president's mid ter
, the republican party for vice president and president nominated candidates who not only had zero foreign policy between them but no coherent policy whatsoever about what to do about the war and didn't mention it. while we have 66,000 americans in that war right now. we have serious things to make serious decisions about as a country. how do we turn down the nonsense enough to hope that our political process can be the means by which we make these grave and serious decisions? joining now is senator jeff merkley of oregon, chief sponsor of the amendment that passed calling on an accelerated withdrawal of u.s. forces from afghanistan. senator merkley, congratulations on the success of that amendment today. >> thank you very much, rachel. it's an incredible amount of things happening around the world today. >> yeah. i feel like this is one of those moments when i have very high hopes and very high wishes for what our political process will be capable of doing, and i have to say, seeing your amendment passed today in such a bipartisan fashion with so much republican support made me have some hope th
on corruption? will they reform the economy. what will their foreign policy look like? i have to great guests to shed light on all of that. welcome. and the new yorker china correspondent. liz, you have a very tough blog posting on the excellent council on foreign relations website which you say china's 18th party congress was a heartbreaker. it was a triumph of the party's skrif -- conservative click. the candidate will the strongest credentials were left high and high. they took their place among the top seven. you see this as a real kind of reinstitution of a hard line conservative group. >> i do. i think this was a disappointing outcome from the 18th party congress. if you look at this leadership group they bring a wealth of experience to the table. collectively these seven men have governed roughly half the provinces. or large municipalities. a number of them do have experience at the national level with the economy or political arena but by in large they are distinguished by their lack of distinction. none of them have been associated with an innovative program or policy reform on the e
, for instance, one of president obama's closest advisers. she was his principal foreign policy adviser during his first campaign and helped shape his world view. they have a similar world view. all of this signifies susan rice would be influential when she goes to speak to diplomats around the world and world leaders and also in formulating foreign policy, which is very good for the state department. on the downside, you see what's happening with the benghazi affair. she's likely to have a bruising confirmation process. some republican senators said they might hold up her nomination. that could drag out a while. john kerry, on the other hand, would be easily confirmable. you see the senators are encouraging president obama to nominate him. senator kerry also has a lot of world stature, has relationships with many world leaders. he's seen as someone who could help build on those relationships to further foreign policy and also senator kerry also, as chairman of the foreign relations committee, very popular chairman, has a lot of diplomatic experience. president obama has used him you know out
. -- worry about it every day. those worries, side by side with a host of international and foreign policy and security challenges. we cannot separate the two. when you are talking about our fiscal situation, there is an obvious connection to our national security. i am cognizant of the connection. today we will be speaking only about foreign policy, and in particular in a very focused way on syria. i want to thank those who have made this possible. as the chairman of a key subcommittee, i value the work that you do, each of you do and fdd does on a range of policy issues, whether it is the security of our troops in afghanistan, but also the work you do to strengthen our policy as it relates to the regime and i ran. -- in iran. your team has brought to the forefront carefully thought out and persuasive research and policy positions that have been an outstanding resource for those of us in congress. i'm especially grateful for that help. i know the theme of this year's form is, foreign dictators, should the west choose sides? quite topical, given the events that have played out recently, wh
,est an mcmorris santoro here as a "friend of bill" and our foreign policy guru, bill cirincione will be in studio as well. one big difference after the election on november 6th you don't see of course, as many campaign commercials every time you turn on the tv. and you also don't have to look at karl rove or dick morris anymore. they were everywhere before the election, of course. on fox news. 24/7 it seemed. with probably the worst insights into -- and the worst analysis of politics ever given anywhere on any channel. here, for example is what we heard from dick morris on greta van susteren right before november 6th. >> we're going win by a landslide. it will be the biggest surprise in recent american political history. it will rekindle a whole question as to why the media played this race as a nail-biter where, in fact, i think romney is going to win by quite a bit. >> bill: why didn't they just listen to me? it will be the biggest surprise. how about the electoral vote column? you need 270. will romney g
we sort of to set politics and issues aside. she bring as 21st century approach to foreign policy. one that is in step with president obama. she also has a great deal of passion for human rights and human dignity. what john kerry has passion for nobody is really sure. he is kind of a vanilla buy. she understands issues of poverty and pandemic and how though pray into national security and foreign policy. jon: on the other hand, senator mccain says, john kerry came within a whisker of being president of the united states, angela. senator mccain went on to say this, i would love to hear him make necessary case. i don't have anything in thinks background like the tragedy in gaziano that would make me carefully examine the situation. >> it is doing susan rice. if kerry is the nominee he would have smooth sailing through. in washington these are friends behind the scenes. if susan rice is nominee we'll have partisan politics. we have the liberal mainstream media already bashing republicans, some calling them racists and sexist in the fact they won't support susan rise because the fact
's a problem with the photo op foreign policy with few real accomplishments and it's becoming more apparent to people around the world. >> gregg: we also supply aid to the palestinians, humanitarian aid. should that be reconsidered most recent actions against israel? >> with any aid you have to ask what it is doing, what goal is it advancing? we keep harping on both parties but seemingly hard the other israelis that we need to come to some sort of negotiation, get to the table have an agreement, petition agreement. i think we need to step back and realize the political factors in place for an agreement. if you have gaza run by hamas, starting wars with israel whenever you turn your back it's not going to lead to an agreement. we should be focusing on money and state on changing those political factors rather than writing these checks left and right. >> gregg: how do we can changes those political factors and what is the possibility in the near or distant future there could be a reconciliation and on the other hand gaza the palestinians there controlled by what is essentially a terrorist gro
's exactly what ari was saying which is the president is asking who is most in sync with my foreign policy? ambassador rice is someone who helped form late the obama foreign policy. i think senator kerry would too. democrats are now in a position where we have an embarrassment of riches. i really hope they don't start worrying about this or that political matter. in democrats can't win elections in massachusetts, there's something fundamentally wrong with what we're doing. >> he did win the last time, scott brown. not this time but the time before he won in massachusetts. we got to leave it there. paul, ari, guys thank you. the search is now on the for the country's latest multimillionaire. in the next hour we'll have the latest on where the winning tickets in the power ballot ri were sold. and coming up next, accusations a u.s. ally is now helping iran cheat on international economic sanctions by helping sell its oil for gold. [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yel
simes, president of the center for the national interest, a foreign policy think tank. and steven heydemann, a senior adviser for middle east initiatives at the united states institute of peace. he's worked with the syrian opposition on the challenges ahead once the assad regime falls. steve, to you first. what do you understand the situation on the ground to be right now in syria? >> we have seen in the past month a significant shift in the momentum of events on the ground. we have seen the opposition increase the effectiveness of its tactics. it has acquired weapons that have permitted it to challenge the regime much more effectively across a broad range of fronts ranging from the south of syria to damascus to the north, and we're seeing this reflected in the regime's response to the opposition including some of the activities surrounding movement of chemical weapons. we don't know exactly what's at stake but part of the speculation is that they're putting themselves into a position in which they could create a defensive zone if it turns out to they're unable to defend damascus
servants. >> rose: today the united states face as wave of foreign policy challenges, including the pressing question of how to respond to the potential use of chemical weapons by the assad government in syria, the government warned him of the consequence conditions consequences he could expect. >> i want to make it clear to assad and those under his command the world is watching, the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons there will be consequences and you will be held accountable. >> rose: i am pleased to have bob gates back at this table. welcome. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what are you doing since you left government? >> well, i am working on a book, a mental with a of my time under presidents bush and obama as secretary of defense, and doing some speaking but staying as far from washington, d.c. as i can. >> rose: when you look at writing a book, i mean, how hard is that for you to take the time anand think of all of the events and make sure that you get it right as you recollect it? >>
ethnic policies and iran, caspian energy, energy and foreign policy and eastern mediterranean energy issues. she previously served as the research director of the caspian studies program at harvard university. should have been a big ten school. in january, she will be a visiting scholar at georgetown university center for eurasia, russian and eastern european studies. alex anthony to specialize in middle eastern affairs with a focus on iraq to join the middle east institute as an adjective call in 2007. he also lectures as a senior fellow in middle east studies at the u.s. air force special operations school and that the defense is a good of security assistance management. want to welcome all of you and would will start, i think will start with you, dr. shaffer, since you're the prettiest gal at the table. >> thank you for the opportunity to testify in front of this committee. would often think of iran as the middle eastern country but actually it sits in the crossroads of a number of regions, southwest asia, central asia and the caucasus. and actually the influence between iran and
these policy issues. in your role now, what do you think is the most critical issue in foreign policy at this point? >> well, there are a series of them. i do think that one has to deal with the issue of continuing terrorism in certain places and as we've already raised, the nuclear proliferation issue. i also -- my personal belief is that the gap between the rich and the poor is something that is a national security issue and needs to be looked at. and what i'm doing here in turkey is being present atten infrastructure conference which does talk about the importance of providing infrastructure in developing countries because it's really a way to pursue giving the people what they need. i believe democracy has to deliver and infrastructure is one of the deliverables that really proves that we can help each over and eliminates what is a basic injustice as this gap between the rich and the poor. >> internal difficulties to overcome, as well. madeleine albright former u.s. secretary of state. thank you again for your time this morning. >>> now if you're just joining us, a reminder these
that so unsecured when the british left and everyone else. if we don't change our strategy from a foreign policy, change this lightfoot print approach to the war on terror there will be more benghazis. martha: what about that morning. i'm joined by kt macfarland. kt, it's so interesting. you watch these shows and you hear benghazi brought up. so often the reacross is get over it. move on. move on. why should we not move on? >> because that wham we did in 1998 when there were twin bombings in u.s. embassies in east africa and in 2000 when there was an attack against the u.s.s. cole in the region. what are we doing now? fast forward a decade. we have had attacks on american soil at consulate and americans had died. what are we doing? we are arguing with ourselves. we know where those died training camps are in eastern libya. why not go after them. what is the lesson al qaeda takes from this? once again no consequences. the americans will be fighting each other, not us. i think we allow them to become emboldened, and this is a green light for continuing to attack americans. martha: what do y
at the foreign policies. where are we in economic transition. absolutely nowhere. so i think the japanese have learned after three years of lost time that they do need to move things forward. okay ldp not being the best, we all know that however, in saying that, they at least know how to implement the policies. >> what's the policy of any significant change of monetary after the election compared to what tell like to see happen? >> there will be much stronger imposed. ldp is already verbally putting this on. it's almost a race who can put more pressure to bank of japan in the sense that they can alleviate the market. of course from a westerner's point of view, i'm sure in a dangerous move that they were asserting far too much pressure to central banks. but that's exactly almost like a tool that's been used for many of the parties involved to get elected right now in japan. >> all right. thank you. good to see you. on the asian agenda tomorrow, third quarter growth figures. india, a check on the country's services industry. and on the political front, as well, parliament gets ready to vote on a
occasional disagreements on the conduct of foreign policy but i think it's been very rare that we have seen differently our views of how the department of defense should undertake its responsibilities. i'd also like to, as the subcommittee chair of the personnel subcommittee, i'd like to express my appreciation to our staff for all the work that they have done on this bill and the others. gary lelee, john clark, bri fire and jennifer knowles. they have been always accessible, extremely professional. it's been a great privilege to work with them. and i'd like a special moment of privilege here to recognize gordon peterson, who has been my military assistant through my time in the united states senate. gordon peterson and i graduated from the naval academy in the same year. he was a very fine and respected athlete at the naval academy. he went on to become a helicopter pilot in combat in vietnam. he gave our country 30 years of distinguished service as a naval officer. later was the editor-in-chief of "seapower" magazine, was special assistant to the commandant of the coast guard, and has bee
the lugar energy initiative, he has combined his foreign policy and agricultural expertise to promote policies to spur economic growth. mr. president, in the dark days following the attacks of september 11, 2001, senator lugar set forth a set of principles to guide our nation in these difficult times. the lugar doctrine calls upon the united states to use all of its military, diplomatic, and economic power without question to ensure that life-threatening weapons of mass destruction everywhere are accounted, contained, and hopefully destroyed. end quote. in addition, the lugar doctrine asserts that america should encourage democratic institutions and decrease reliance on foreign energy sources. these accomplishments and so many more stem from a profound intellect combined with characteristic. there's nothing i love more than to hear dick lugar give a tutorial on any country in the world, and he can do so; he can talk knowledgeably and teach us about any country in the world. that is the depth of his experience, his knowledge, his expertise. dick has also always been a voice of reason i
that a higher priority in your own foreign policy? >> the short answer would be yes. all those countries that you have listed, and more, certainly in terms of their economic capacity, compared to some of the smaller democracies, particularly some in the americas that have a long history of embracing democratic values, but they would not have the bankroll, if you will, to participate in international missions. again i, i keep using afghanistan as a touchstone, but there are 40 countries with boots on the ground. there are more than 60 that contribute on the development side. japan now, sweden. some of those democracies that are really in making a remarkable difference in the day-to-day lives of afghans. there are many ways where democracy can help spread democracy, which i think is a worthwhile endeavor and we would agree. there are different ways in which can engage non-militarily that are arguably going to have a much needed defect in parts of the world right now. in some of these troubled areas, it is clearly at a to pinpoint where development is not the issue. >> but someone has to pr
article in foreign policy recently. has been was a china adviser to mitt romney. he now heads the university of chicago. but he basically wrote about the sort of two chinas or to the ages. he said there's sort of a doctor jekyll and mr. hide that's evolving to a doctor jekyll, which is the nicer of the two is the economic issue. the dr. height is the strategic asia, is the security agent. if you look at the economic asia there's heavy amounts of interdependence, everybody is investigating each other. $19 billion in regional trade which includes india. if you look at the security asia, national entity, orders dispute, historical grievances just are driving things apart and you're seeing real impact on these. in the has its own problems in the region across china region across china. region across chandigarh on the border dispute. if you look at this is something that you want to be deeply engaged in or do you look at this is basically something that you can ride along and freeload and let america and canada and japan handled? >> steve, your question -- >> i'm and freeload, by t
. that is the bipartisan tradition we need more of in washington, especially on foreign policy. as you prepare to leave the senate you love, i think i speak on behalf of everybody here and millions of people across the country when i say your legacy will endure in a safer and more secure world and a safer and more secure america. we pray this nation produces more leaders with your sense of decency and stability and integrity. we are grateful to you. thank you very much. [applause] i will point out it was the coup took me on my first foreign trip as a senator to russia, ukraine, and we were there to see the cooperative production program in action. the first thing i learned is when dick travels overseas, it is not a duncan. -- junkin. we did not stop and look at beautiful sights and lounge around. he wore out every 25-year-old staffoer. what you also learn is dick -- the more remote a place is, the more obscure the facility is, the bigger a rock star dick is. [laughter] they love him. i remember walking through one facility. i leaned in for a closer look. they said, do not touch that orange stuff. at an
. they came up in every debate. even foreign policy debate. and so we think that the american people are on the side of the president and democrats. that is not to say -- [inaudible] we want to remind everyone that there's already been a trillion dollars, over a trillion dollars in spending cuts. and so that is a significant part of this debate, because it happened last year. but just because washington has a short memory doesn't mean we all should have one. and that there's already been sacrifice on behalf of through those discretionary cuts. we are particularly excited doing a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we talked about medical savings through the programs, address rising national expenditure. will have more to say on taxes, but we are ecstatic to have senator durbin here today who has played such a fundamental role over the last several years. been part of literally every negotiation that has taken place. he still an optimist, so i think that is a sign of progress. he has had a long history of being a champion and advocate for the middle class. he has carried that advocacy in
and rockets that smuggle to hamas. in the second term, no foreign policy challenge is more critical. the president has been dealing with iran's suspected nuclear threats. >> andrea mitchell in washington. thanks so much. >>> egypt islamists approved a draft constitution this morning that could further enrage anti-government protesters. it was passed without participation of liberal and christian members. human rights experts fear it could give muslim clerics influence over legislation and restrict freedom of speech and women's rights. >>> a spokesman says former president george h.w. bush should be able to leave the hospital by the weekend. he has been hospitalized for complications from bronchitis. >>> last day of trading for november. what's moving the markets? good morning, kayla. >> the stocks are following the fiscal cliff and the market dove yesterday on comments from house speaker john boehner. data released yesterday showed economic growth in the u.s. is still weak. consumers and businesses alike are putting a hold on spending. natalie? >> thank you. >>> and a grade school i
received by the foreign relations committee. joining the convention will not require any change. i emphasize that again it doesn't require any change. in the existing united states law of policies regarding treatment of the disabled. and the statements before the foreign relations committee, the united states would assume in joining the convention. in order to } the importance of this point, the foreign relations committee specifically address it -- in the instrument of ratification, the current united states law for bills the obligations of the convention of the united states of america. on a related point, we also underscored that the convention will not be self-executing in the united states law. this means that the provisions are not directly enforceable in united states courts. and we do not confer private rights of action enforceable in the united states. these provisions of advice and consent establish important parameters. they give effect to the intent of the senate and they join in the convention that will not require any changes the united states laws and policies, with
-service tonight here on c-span. next, the israeli foreign minister talks about the impediments to peace in the region. speaking from the saban center for middle east policy, this is about an hour. >> we meet at a time of great turmoil and the middle east. just after the presidential election and the united states. two weeks ago, we were looking at the prospect of canceling the forum because of the war that was going on with hamas and gaza. thankfully, calm has been restored. hopefully it is a lasting calm. every day brings dramatic news from the middle east. yesterday, the plo won recognition as a non-member observer state. egyptians were in the street demonstrating against their newly elected muslim brotherhood president's latest decrees. this evening, the governor of israel announced 3000 new settlements. how is the united states and israel to cope with all of these dramatic developments? how is the united states and israel to deal with the ongoing revolutions customer the descent into chaos and syria, the growing divide that is spreading across the arab world and the broader middle e
our foreign policy. the chair and i both have worked for several years now trying to get the law of the sea treaty into place. it's been bouncing around for decades. but it should be more than what they call consultation. every time we talk to the executive branch -- and i am a former member of the executive branch; i spent four years in the pentagon in the reagan administration -- they say that they have consulted and the definition of a consultation should be the secretary of state calling the chairman of the foreign relations committee or the secretary of defense calling the chairman of the armed services committee or coming over for a meeting. that is not the level of discussion and involvement that the united states congress should have when we are talking about long-term commitments with countries such as afghanistan and iraq. so this amendment is not draconian. it is very sensible. it basically says that in the situation where we have entered into this proposed relationship with afghanistan, that the key committees over here in the united states congress should have 30 day
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)